March in the Garden

March

March in the garden is shaping up to look an awful lot like February in the garden this year. We had a couple of nice 50 degree days two weeks ago, and I really thought I’d be able to plant my peas by now. But winter returned last week and we got another 6 or 8 inches of snow. As of this afternoon there was still an inch or two on the ground. I stood there for a while staring at the snow, as if I could will it to melt away if I stared hard enough.

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Some Much Needed Color

Saint Patrick’s Day is supposed to be pea planting time, but with temperatures barely getting above freezing today, I was hunkered down inside instead of digging in the garden. Winter seems determined to hang on a little while longer this year, and outside the spring bulbs are just barely beginning to push up through the soil.

This time of year the spring flower shows at the Smith College and Mount Holyoke College Botanic Gardens are the perfect antidote to the late winter gloom outside. Continue reading

Sugar Shack Season

syrup samples in the window

Here in New England winter usually lasts a few more weeks than we’d like it to, as you may have guessed from all my grumbling lately. It snowed again last weekend, and then a little more Thursday and Friday.  But truth be told I wouldn’t have it any other way, because cold winters and the slow, gradual arrival of spring make for a bountiful maple sugaring season. Continue reading

February in the Garden

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Yesterday morning I awoke to the worst kind of weather, a couple inches of wet snow overnight followed by pouring rain all day long. It was a slushy mess. The ground is still covered with a few inches of snow leftover from the blizzard a few weeks ago, despite plenty of above freezing days since then. The seeds have been organized, charts and plans have been made, and the onion seedlings are coming along nicely, but it’s going to be a while before I’m able to dig in the garden. Continue reading